If you are pregnant and want to travel, there are some things that you need to know about traveling while pregnant. Pregnant women should not travel for long periods of time unless their doctor says otherwise. If you do plan on traveling, here is what you need to know:

Talk to your healthcare provider before booking a flight.

You should talk to your healthcare provider before booking a flight. You’ll want to find out the risks of travel for you, your baby and your health.

The best way to stay safe during travel is by knowing what to do in case of an emergency. It’s also important to know how to stay healthy during travel.

Pregnant woman traveler in denim dress, blue straw hat sits by the sea, dangles legs with splashes

Be mindful of what to pack in your carry-on bag.

  • Be mindful of what you pack in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t pack anything that could be a security risk, like weapons or liquids.
  • Don’t pack anything that could be a fire hazard, like matches and lighters.
  • Don’t pack anything that could be a health hazard, like expired medication or spoiled food (or even just gum).
  • And lastly: don’t pack anything that could be a safety hazard for yourself or others on the plane!

Do not choose a seat near the restroom.

  • Do not choose a seat near the restroom. Bathrooms are no fun to be near during flight, but it’s especially bad when you’re pregnant. If you must sit by the bathroom, make sure it’s on the other side of your row so that you can get out before anyone else has to use it (and vice versa). Otherwise, consider asking if they have any other open seats elsewhere on the plane.
  • Make sure that your seat is close enough to a power outlet for charging purposes and far enough away from everyone else so that you can stretch out without disturbing them or hitting their headrests.

Have a plan for where you will stay if you go into labor unexpectedly.

Have a plan for where you will stay if you go into labor unexpectedly.

If your air travel is booked, you’ll want to make sure that there are no restrictions on the number of days before or after your due date that you can fly. Some airlines have policies about not accepting passengers who are 35 weeks pregnant or further advanced in their pregnancy. It’s also important to know that if something does happen on the plane (like an emergency landing), it may be difficult for medical personnel to get to you in time because they won’t have access to oxygen masks and other safety equipment unless there’s an infant onboard as well!

Take care when walking through security.

  • Don’t bring anything that could be considered a weapon.
  • Don’t bring any items that could be considered a prohibited item. You can check with your airline to avoid surprises at the airport, but common sense goes a long way as well.
  • Don’t bring any liquids that are over 3 oz (100 ml). If you need to pack more than this amount of liquid in your carry-on luggage, put it inside an empty water bottle and put that in another clear plastic bag.
  • Do not try to walk through security while pregnant without making sure you have all the required documentation for traveling with your child after birth—and preferably before the trip starts too!

Pack snacks and water in case you encounter delays.

Adult pregnant woman in vest, white overalls stands by the sea. The concept of motherhood in travel
  • Pack snacks and water in case you encounter delays. Snacks are important to have on hand for both you and your baby, so make sure you bring enough for everyone!
  • Bring snacks for the whole family. You’ll want plenty of food options available at all times, so plan accordingly.
  • Bring a small umbrella stroller. This will be especially helpful if you’re traveling with other people or babies; it’s small enough that it can fit almost anywhere but still holds up well under pressure!
  • Bring a small cooler with ice packs. It may sound silly, but having a cooler full of ice packs is amazing when traveling—they don’t take up much space and they keep food fresh longer than regular ice cubes would!
  • Bring a change of clothes for the baby (and yourself). If things go awry on your trip—and they sometimes do—you’ll be grateful that you have these items readily available in case anything goes wrong while away from home base!

Take advantage of preboarding when available.

This is when you get to board the plane before other passengers so that you have more time to get settled and comfortable. This is usually reserved for first class, elite frequent fliers, and people with disabilities. However, if you’re pregnant and traveling alone with a young child who may need help getting on or off an airplane seat (which could take 30 minutes), then it’s reasonable to ask if they’ll let you preboard too!

You can travel 7 months pregnant, but it is a good idea to get clearance from your doctor first if you are having any problems with your pregnancy.

You can travel seven months pregnant, but it is a good idea to get clearance from your doctor first if you are having any problems with your pregnancy. If you have any questions, talk to your doctor. Make sure that if you need to contact him or her while traveling, that he or she is available by phone and email.

There is no reason why you can’t travel while pregnant, as long as you take precautions and stay healthy. Once your doctor has given the okay, then there’s no reason not to explore the world!