You may have heard that you need to have a passport and visa to visit Mexico. It’s true that travel documents are travel requirements to Mexico, but once you’re there, most American travelers don’t need any extra paperwork. Here’s what you need:

1. Passport is one of the travel requirements to Mexico

Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your travel date. It must also have at least two blank pages, and you cannot be a Mexican citizen to use your Mexican passport as identification.

Your passport should also be signed and stamped by a government official or authority issuing the document. Your passport should also be in good condition, meaning no pages are missing or faded, damaged by water or other causes (like an animal biting you), or otherwise defaced. If any of these things happen to your passport while traveling abroad, make sure that they’re fixed before going through customs!

Finally, remember that each page of your passport needs to contain a photo of yourself—so don’t forget this requirement!

2. Electronic I-94 form is another requirement to travel to Mexico

  • You will be given an electronic I-94 form to fill out when you enter Mexico. This is a form that asks for your personal information and travel details, including where you are going and how long you plan to stay.
  • The immigration officer will print out a copy of this form, which they will give back to you. They may also keep a copy of it on file or in another location in case they need access to it later on (such as if they see someone traveling with multiple groups).
  • Use the electronic I-94 as proof of entry into Mexico for 30 days from when it was issued. Remember: make sure all information is correct before submitting it!

3. Tourist card

If you’re entering Mexico as a tourist and don’t have a visa waiver (see below), you’ll need to fill out a Tourist Card when entering the country. The process is simple: fill out the form online, print it off, take your passport and form to the airport/border crossing, give them both to an immigration officer who will check them over, then throw away the form after leaving Mexico. It’s free–but if you want one printed out for convenience purposes, there’s a $10 charge per card.

You can also request multiple copies of your tourist card so that they can be shown at various checkpoints throughout your trip–this may come in handy if you want to visit multiple provinces or states in one trip by bus or car!

4. Visa

A visa is a one of the most important requirements to travel to Mexico. It’s not required for citizens of the United States, Canada and Australia (exempted from regulations).

Although not mandatory for all countries, it’s highly recommended that you apply for one. A tourist visa grants you permission to stay in Mexico for up to 180 days (this number may vary depending on which country you come from). When you arrive at an airport or border crossing, immigration officers will check your passport and ask if you have any other documents such as an onward ticket or hotel reservation confirmation. You will also need proof-of-travel health insurance coverage that covers medical expenses in case of an emergency or accident while abroad (be sure this includes dental) before they let you through!

5. Exit tax

If you’re a tourist, there is an exit tax you must pay when you leave Mexico. This is not paid by residents or citizens of Mexico; it’s only paid by tourists. The fee usually ranges from $20 to $25, depending on where your flight is leaving from and what country you’re flying into (some countries may have their own fees). If the airline doesn’t include this in your ticket price, then they are required to charge it separately at check-in.

Conclusion

While it’s important to know the travel requirements to Mexico, don’t stress about it too much. The country is full of great places that don’t require any extra paperwork. We hope this article has been helpful in helping you plan your trip!